24 Months 1 Week – Answering a Variety of “Wh” Questions

Roman with dino capThe most difficult part of answering a “wh” questions is actually knowing the meaning of the “wh” word. For instance, you have to know that “who” is asking for a person, “where” is asking for a place, “what” is asking for a thing, “when” is referring to a time, and “why” is asking for a reason. “When” and “where” may still be too complicated for this age, but it’s always good to throw it in here and there.

When talking about “who” you can stick to basic things like looking through a photo album to label family members names or you can make it harder as in “Who drives a bus?”.  Visual support is always welcome at this age and can be in the form of pictures, illustrations in books, videos, etc.  And remind them that “who” is asking for a person.    

As for “what”, it could be as simple as asking “What is this?” while using a flashcard, reading a book, etc.  This usually only encourages a one-word response since it is not open-ended.  You can make it slightly more complicated by saying “What do you see?”, “What do you need?”, etc.  This allows for them to use a start phrase such as “I see a duck”.  You can then go onto more difficult questions such as “What does a cow say?”, “What do you wear when it’s hot?”  

When referring to “where” they have to know that you are asking about a place, so we find that when you’re walking down the street, driving, etc. it is helpful to talk about where you are going.  You can even talk about the immediate here and now and ask “Where are you right now?” (e.g. – at home, in the car, in the stroller, etc.).  It also gradually helps them understand concepts that are not tangible such as “Where is daddy?” (e.g. – work, on a business trip, etc.) – actual pictures of daddy at his workplace would also be great!

Hands-On Speech & Social Development Workshop Series

We are very excited to announce that we are teaming up with @six_degreesofmom to bring to you the Exclusive Hands-On Speech & Social Development Workshop Series. It’s a 3-day workshop for Moms & Babies (6-14 months) and Moms & Toddlers (15-24 Months). We will focus on functional activities for #expressivelanguage #receptivelanguageand #play!

Moms & Babies (6-14 months) 

11 AM -12 PM Wednesdays (6-14 months)

2/24   Week 1:  Functional Activities for Expressive Language.  Imitation and turn-taking with sounds and motor actions (clapping, arms up), teaching gestures (waving, shaking head “no”), how to use sounds to request, how to encourage babbling/jargon/first words, going over “first sounds” (m, b, p) and tactile cues you can use on the face.

3/2 Week 2:  Functional Activities for Receptive Language.  How to get your baby to respond to their name, encouraging recognition of common words/people (shoe, ball, mama), following simple commands (“give me”) and basic concepts (“no”, “hot”).

3/9  Week 3:  Functional Activities for Social Skills/Play.  How to teach functional play (banging a drum), playing social games such as “peek a boo” and “hide and seek”.

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Toddlers (15-24 months)

11 AM -12 PM Fridays (15-24 Months)

2/26 Week 1:  Functional Activities for Expressive Language.  How to encourage sounds effects (animal sounds) and common first words (“milk”, “juice”, “me”, “bye”, “hi”,” no”), promote 2-word phrases (“mama juice”, “daddy up”), teach intonation for basic questions, going over normal articulation errors (final consonant deletion)

3/4 Week 2:  Functional Activities for Receptive Language.  How to follow 1-2 step basic and more complex commands (“Give me the ball” to “Take the book and give it to mommy”), learning body parts, identifying common objects in the environment, answering basic questions such as “What’s that?”, teaching basic quantity concepts “one” (“give me one block”)

3/11 Week 3:  Functional Activities for Social Skills/Play.  How to teach self-directed play (feeding mommy with a spoon), encourage relational play (puts passenger in car and pushes it, uses spoon to feed baby doll), pretend play performing action sequences (kisses the doll and then puts doll to bed), parallel play, importance of problem-solving toys (stacking blocks, shape sorter, nesting cups,), problem solving when an object is missing (let’s mix the food, but no spoon is provided), encouraging a sense of humor, favorite turn-taking activities (rolling the ball back and forth).

Sign-up requires a member referral so anyone who wants to join they can email invite@sixdegreesofmom.com with your name and Six Degress of Mom will send to you the JOIN instructions.

West Village NYC Workshop Series held by www.sixdegreesofmom.com

weather

Perfect for a #rainy day! For some sessions we worked on #labeling #clothing and for others we talked about what you need for certain #weather and dressed up the girl – #colorforms rock!