22 Months 1 Week – Combining Chores with Following Directions

Roman dancing. It’s never too early to start learning about chores and how to help out in the house!Now that your child is getting better at following directions feel free to intertwine basic “chores” into the daily routine.  

It could be as simple as cleaning up. From an early age we started the clean up song even when he did not speak just so he got used to the melody and words. At this point you can sing it along with them and see if they hum along or imitate any of the words. Just hearing the song will trigger cleaning up after playtime or even mealtime.  Once they get used to the routine they will begin cleaning up on their own, sometimes even singing the song all by themselves!

Specific directions you can give is “Give me your cup/plate/fork and let’s put it in the sink” (they most likely cannot reach yet even with a step stool, but it’s good to practice), “Put your ____ in the dishwasher”, “Throw it in the garbage”, “Go get me a paper towel”, “Put your socks away” (or any clothing), “Walk the dog”, etc.  We even found working on colors while doing laundry is an excellent receptive language task (e.g. – dark vs. light or putting all the red socks together).

22 Months – Encouraging “I feel…” Sentences

Roman is happy. The world is an exciting place and it comes with lots of feelings for little ones (and adults), so we have to make sure we give them a voice to talk about how they feel.  For instance, my son is starting to get the concept of “scary” if it’s a ghost, lion, etc. and he will comment saying phrases such as “ghost scary”.

TAG We recommend starting off with basic feelings such as happy vs. sad.  You can practice smiling and frowning in front of the mirror and labeling the feelings with one word.  We also started by looking at pictures of babies in Mrs. Mustard’s Baby Feelings book and our Baby Feeling ibook since they are clear depictions of happy vs. sad.  We also talked about feelings while watching videos or television shows to make screen time an interactive experience.

You can also talk about feelings as they happen since this is the prime age for tantrums!  For instance, if someone took their toy away you can label the feeling with a sentence such as “I know that makes you feel SAD”.  As they get the hang of it, you can add more complicated feelings in such as excited, scary, surprised, etc.  They love imitating your facial expressions and even pretending!  For instance, you can do role-play with dinosaurs and pretend to hide under a blanket or pillows to pretend to be very scared!  Targeting feelings through story time and art are also fantastic ways to go over feelings and using that starter phrase “I feel ____”, “She feels ____”, “He feels ____”, “They feel ____”, etc.  Have a HAPPY day! ☺

21 Months 3 Weeks – Is your Child Under the Weather?  Phrases to Encourage

Roman and books

It’s the saddest thing when kiddos are sick, but if they can express themselves when they are it makes it 10 times easier for us!  Here are some go-to phrases to teach and model for your child.

“I don’t feel good” or “I feel sick”

“Tummy hurt” or any “Body part + hurt”

Comments such as “Yucky” or “Gross”

“I need sleep” or anything else they may need such as an ice pack or even a hug

“I want daddy”

Roman with more booksMany will also ask “wh” questions like “why” and it’s a prefect opportunity to explain to them what is going on in their body!  Hope the germs stay away and you all stay healthy!  Summer is right around the corner ☺

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21 Months 2 Weeks – Asking “Where” Questions

Roman playing When your child begins to ask question it is certainly the cutest thing on Earth!  It might not even start as the word and they may just hold their hands up as if to ask where.  They are basically copying what they see us do.  In order to promote questions such as “where” things or people need to disappear!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

We find that using naturally occurring opportunities is always a great way to target “where”.  Let’s say in your household one parent goes to work in the morning and you practice saying “Bye Bye”… after that person leaves ask “Where did ____ go?”.  The more consistent you are with your language, the more likely they will try to imitate it and then ultimately say it independently.  Also, do not hesitate to talk about where Mommy and Daddy actually are.  They of course do not fully understand the concept of work, shopping, errands, etc. yet, but it’s teaching them that when people ask “where” it is referring to a place.  It also helps give them a sense of time and routine (e.g. – we run errands in the afternoon).  

And there are of course the millions of language opportunities that you can intentionally create, which is great for practicing object permanence.  For instance, you can keep it simple and use a blanket and have a block disappear under the blanket and then ask “where” while also doing a confused gesture.  You can also do more involved activities such as creating a sensory bin filled with rice, beans, grass, leaves, etc.  Hide some of their favorite objects inside or magnets, animals, shapes, letters, etc. Before looking you can model “where” once again and then comment on what you find within the sensory bin.  It’s a great vocabulary building activity!  

21 Months 1 Week – Using Size Descriptor Words

Roman Happy A great way to achieve 2-3 word phrases is to learn words other than nouns. This can include prepositions, adjectives, etc. This week we will talk specifically about using size descriptor words to expand phrases.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Roman big and heavyThe first step as always is modeling what you want your child to say. In terms of size, “big” always seems to stand out. Try to find huge items in the home or outside such as big chair, big slide, etc. to comment on.  A tip is to also make a big deal about it in order to emphasize it – “Wow look that’s a big moon!”. They may initially imitate the word “big”, so keep adding onto that word by verbally modeling such as “Yes it’s a big step”, “You’re right that’s a big orange”, etc.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Roman loves targetOnce they get the hang of that you can target the opposite “small”.  We like to target this by starting with a big piece of fruit and cutting it up into smaller pieces to show them the difference. It’s a great activity to do with play dough as well! And feel free to use synonyms such as “tiny” when you’re teaching size. Other size concepts later on could be short vs. tall, wide vs. narrow, etc.

21 Months – Helping your Toddler Create Phrases with Possessive Words

roman with his lightsWe recently did a post about building phrases with “me” and “mine” such as “my shoes”.  Your child is very observant and he or she is beginning to know what specific items belong to certain people.  Often many of us are (unfortunately) attached to our phone these days so a common phrase you may hear is “Mommy phone”.  The more they see us with an item the more they will associate it with us.                                                                                         

We like to start off with clothing since a jacket, for example, is something we wear every day in the fall/winter.  They may be imitating or spontaneously saying “jacket” or “coat”, but you can now begin modeling possession such as “mommy coat”.  Other things to target could be toys or other personal items.  For instance, you could choose something that belongs to them such as “Roman’s dinosaur”.  They may not say the ‘s part quite yet, but just to get them thinking about WHO it belongs to is a big step.  

These techniques have also been helpful with behavior.  Let’s say your child is trying to rip the papers of a magazine that you are reading.  To put an end to this behavior, you can say “This is Mommy’s magazine and this is Roman’s book… we read magazines and books”.  The more you use the same language, the more likely they will catch on, listen, and say it back!

20 Months 3 Weeks – Ways to Promote Winter Vocabulary

Roman looking at snowBrrrr!  It’s been quite a cold winter! Weather is one of the perfect opportunities to get kids talking! You can comment on temperature, setting, clothing, as well as related actions and winter activities. Our best piece of advice is to keep your words consistent so your child can catch on easily!                                                                                                       

Roman outsideYou want to always start off verbally modeling what you want your child to say. For instance, when the weather was beginning to get cold we produced words such as “cold”, “windy”, “freezing”, etc. We kept repeating it as often as we could and after one month he began saying it independently. It’s also great to review winter clothing items such as “jacket”, “hat”, “boots”, “scarf”, “gloves/mittens”, “boots”, “sweater”, “pants”, etc. And if your child is ready for phrases you can target ones such as “my hat” or “I want jacket”.  

Roman bringing snow inThings you see in the winter are also great such as “snow”, “ice”, etc. We even like to comment on how the trees are bare and the leaves are on the ground. Other winter related words include actions such as “sledding”, “sliding”, etc.  You can add in some nouns (e.g. – “sled”, “ice skates”, etc.) and adjectives (e.g. – “slippery”). We personally love doing sensory activities (e.g. – bringing snow inside, putting ice cubes in a tray, etc.) to practice all of the vocabulary above and talk about how things “feel”. Then, finish it off with some fun activities like eating S’mores and making hot chocolate!